Iraq Reporting Should Come With a Warning

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At the Nation’s blog, Tom Engelhardt, reflecting on a comment by New York Times Iraq reporter that “98 percent of Iraq, and even most of Baghdad, has now become ‘off-limits’ for Western journalists,” has this to say:

Here’s the problem. I’ve been reading New York Times reportage since the invasion of Iraq began and I don’t remember running across a figure like that — and neither has just about anyone else who happens to have been reading a major paper in the US for the last year. When, way back in September 2004, an e-mail from the Wall Street Journal‘s fine reporter Farnaz Fassihi slipped into public view, suggesting that “[b]eing a foreign correspondent in Baghdad these days is like being under virtual house arrest,” it was treated as a scandal in the media; her “objectivity” was called into question; and (if memory serves) she was sent on vacation until after the presidential election. While there was a vigorous discussion in the British press of what came to be called “hotel journalism,” it was hardly a subject here, once you got past The New York Review of Books.

Tom’s solution: a sort of news consumer’s health warning:

Cigarette packs have their warning labels, as do vitamin supplements. Shouldn’t our news have the equivalent? How about little pie-chart icons before each Iraqi story suggesting what percentage of the news pie had been available that day. Or a warning label that might say: “This ordinary piece was put together by American reporters locked in their well-guarded and barricaded buildings from scraps of information delivered by Iraqi reporters who can’t even tell their families where they work for fear of assassination.”

Worth reading in full.

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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