Some Men’s Trash More Treasured Than Other’s

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There’s a garbage strike going on across the San Francisco Bay. Waste Management of Alameda County, serving the 7th largest county in the state with 1.5 million residents (that’s more than all of Idaho), has locked out its 500 workers over contract disputes, and there’s no end in sight. So for now 200 replacement workers are scrambling to keep up.

Here’s the rub: Turns out that while pickups are proceeding in the county’s wealthy neighborhoods, the less well-to-do areas are becoming giant trash heaps. Manicured enclaves like Castro Valley and Montclair in Oakland—where seven-figure homes are commonplace—and even most of Berkeley are just fine; pickups have stayed on schedule.

But trash is piling up in poor neighborhoods. West and East Oakland have been the most neglected (two of our editors live in East Oakland, myself included), with garbage cans overflowing and bags stacking deep and wide from block to block. This, despite the fact that the monthly fees we pay are exactly the same as those in Piedmont, Oakland’s Bel Air.

All Waste Management, has to say to the discrepancy is that the irregularities are no fault of the company’s and to “have patience.” Yeah? Tell that to the raccoons hanging out outside our houses at night.

Luckily our city’s patience has also worn thin. Today Oakland filed a lawsuit against Waste Management saying that the accumulated waste is “a clear and compelling safety and health and welfare issue,” with potential health risks if garbage piles up in such dense urban areas.

That, yeah, but it’s also an issue of dignity and echoes of the Superdome reverberate. All in all, it stinks.

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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