Rachel Paulose at the SEC?

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Out of the colorful cast of characters who brought you the US Attorneys scandal, one of the most memorable was Rachel Paulose, the young Bush loyalist installed as the head of the Minnesota federal prosecutor’s office in 2006. A pal of Monica Goodling, Paulose quickly attracted attention for her swearing-in ceremony, which some observers compared to a coronation. (Although, would you feel properly sworn-in without a color guard and a choir?) She then proceeded to alienate many of the experienced lawyers in her office by quoting Bible verses and ruthlessly dressing down underlings; three senior lawyers in the office resigned their managerial posts in protest. Paulose herself departed her job in 2007; later, a DOJ Office of Special Counsel investigation found that she’d improperly fired one of her subordinates after he complained that she often left classified homeland security reports lying around on her desk.

Now, Joe Palazzo at the very useful Main Justice has spotted that Paulose is still drawing a government salary. She was hired by the Securities and Exchange Commission in March, and works as a senior trial counsel in its Miami office. From what I can tell, out of the most controversial figures in the US attorneys imbroglio, Paulose is the only one who still works for the federal government. A ‘where are they now’ roundup below the jump:

Kyle Sampson: Lobbyist focusing on the FDA.

Harriet Miers: Lobbyist for Pakistan.

Bradley Schlozman: Listed as an attorney at the law firm of Hinkle Elkouri in Wichita, Kansas.

Alberto Gonzales: Will teach political science at Texas Tech, starting with a class this fall on “contemporary issues facing the executive branch.” (That is, unless a growing protest by Texas Tech professors spikes his job offer.)

Timothy Griffin: Quit public service forever in teary huff, returned to his first love, political consulting.

Monica Goodling: A consultant. Also got married after an old college sweetheart saw her testify before Congress and called to say hello. How’s that for a silver lining?

 

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SIX TRUTHS

Reclaiming power from those who abuse it often starts with telling the truth. And in "This Is How Authoritarians Get Defeated," MoJo's Monika Bauerlein unpacks six truths to remember during the homestretch of an election where democracy, truth, and decency are on the line.

Truth #1: The chaos is the point.

Truth #2: Team Reality is bigger than it seems.

Truth #3: Facebook owns this.

Truth #4: When we go to work, we're in the fight.

Truth #5: It's about minority rule.

Truth #6: The only thing that can save us is…us.

Please take a moment to see how all these truths add up, because what happens in the weeks and months ahead will reverberate for at least a generation and we better be prepared.

And if you think journalism like Mother Jones'—that calls it like it is, that will never acquiesce to power, that looks where others don't—can help guide us through this historic, high-stakes moment, and you're able to right now, please help us reach our $350,000 goal by October 31 with a donation today. It's all hands on deck for democracy.

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